CMES faculty

People: Faculty

Profile: Asad Ahmed

Asad Ahmed
Assistant Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies
Phone:
Web: Website

 

Professor Asad Q.

Publications

The Religious Elite of the Early Islamic Hijaz. P&G, University of Oxford, 2011.

Avicenna's Deliverance: Logic. Oxford University Press, 2011.

In the field of intellectual history, Asad's long term goal is to write a responsible history of the rationalist sciences (ma'qulat) after the so-called Golden Age of Islam.  Since such work first and foremost requires detailed and piecemeal studies of texts in logic, theology, philosophy, jurisprudence, etc., much of his output in this area focuses either on case studies of salient technical issues or on the rationalist tradition in pre-modern and early modern Muslim India.  In this area of scholarly interest, Asad has published Avicenna's Deliverance: Logic (Oxford University Press, 2011), in addition to a number of articles.  Asad's more general training includes classical Arabic poetry and poetics, Graeco-Arabica, and Qur'anic and Hadith studies.

People: Faculty

Profile: Elsa Elmahdy

Elsa Elmahdy
Phone:

 

[no profile]

Publications

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People: Faculty

Profile: Soraya Tlatli

Soraya Tlatli
Soraya Tlatli
Associate Professor of French Studies
Phone: 510-642-2712
Web: Website

 

Soraya Tlatli is an Associate Professor of French Studies. Her research interests focus on francophone literature, particularly from North Africa, as well as colonial and postcolonial historiography. She has also written and researched on 20th century French psychoanalysis, philosophy and intellectual history. Tlatli received her M.A. in 1990 from John Hopkins University and her Ph.D. in 1991 from Emory University.

Publications

  • “French Nationalism and the Issue of North African immigration,” in Franco-Arab Encounters, ed. Carl Brown, Beirut: American University of Beirut Press, 1996.
  • Le Psychiatre et ses Poètes: essai sur le jeune Lacan. TCHOU, Paris, 2000.
  • La Folie Lyrique: essai sur le surréalisme et la psychiatrie. L’Harmattan, Paris, 2004.
  • “Algeria as an Archive,” in Derrida and the Time of the Political, eds. Pheng Cheah and Suzanne Guerlac. Duke University Press, July 2006.

People: Faculty

Profile: Cihan Tugal

Cihan Tugal
Cihan Tugal
Professor of Sociology
Phone: 510-642-4766
Web: Website

 

Cihan Tugal is a Professor of Sociology. His research explores how the interaction between religion and politics shapes everyday life, urban space, class relations, and national identity. Tugal also studies Islamic mobilization in Turkey, Iran and Egypt to understand why similar movements have not resulted in a comparable Islamic market consensus in these countries. He argues that Islamic politics has interacted with civil society and the state in different ways in these three cases, leading to the victory of neo-liberalized Islam in Turkey, its defeat in Iran, and a stalemate in Egypt.

Publications

  • Passive Revolution: Absorbing the Islamic Challenge to Capitalism. Stanford University Press, 2009.

Articles include “Islamism in Turkey: Beyond Instrument and Meaning,” Economy of Society 31(1): 85-111; 2002; “State and Society in the Study of Islam: Discontents of a Dichotomy,” New Perspectives on Turkey 31. (Review Essay), 2005; “The Appeal of Islamic Politics: Ritual and Dialogue in a Poor District of Turkey,” The Sociological Quarterly, 2006; and “Memories of Violence, Memoirs of Nation: 1915 and the Construction of Armenian Identity,” in Esra Ozyurek (ed.) Politics of Public Memory, Syracuse University Press, 2007. His research was also published in Economy and Society, Theory and Society, Sociological Theory, the New Left Review, the Sociological Quarterly, and edited volumes.

People: Faculty

Profile: Stefania Pandolfo

Stefania Pandolfo
Stefania Pandolfo
Professor of Social Cultural Anthropology
Phone: 510-642-3392
Web: Website

 

Stefania Pandolfo is a Professor of Social Cultural Anthropology. Her research involves the study of theories and forms of subjectivity and their contemporary predicaments in the Middle Eastern and Muslim world.

Publications

  • Impasse of the Angels: Scenes from a Moroccan Space of Memory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.
  • The Thin Line of Modernity in Some Moroccan Debates on Subjectivity. University of Minnesota Press, Forthcoming.

People: Faculty

Profile: Laura Nader

Laura Nader
Laura Nader
Professor of Social Cultural Anthropology
Phone: 510-642-3392
Web: Website

 

Laura Nader is a Professor of Social Cultural Anthropology. Her current work focuses on how central dogmas are made and how they work in law, energy science, and anthropology. Nader’s areas of interest include comparative ethnography of law and dispute resolution, conflict, comparative family organization, the anthropology of professional mindsets and ethnology of the Middle East, Mexico, Latin America, and the contemporary United States. Her films To Make the Balance and Little Injustices are widely disseminated.

Publications

  • Harmony, Ideology—Injustice and Control in a Mountain Zapotec Village (1990).
  • The Life of the Law: Anthropological Projects (2002).
  • Plunder—When the Rule of Law is Illegal (2008).
  • Energy Choices in a Democratic Society (1980).
  • Naked Science—Anthropological Inquiry into Boundaries, Power, and Knowledge (1996).
  • Essays in Controlling Processes (1994, 1996, 2002).

Nader’s recent articles and edited contributions include a review of “An Invitation to Laughter: A Lebanese Anthropologist in the Arab World” by Fuad I. Khouri. American Anthropologist June 2008; “What the Rest Think of the West-Legal Dimensions.” Global Jurist. Berkeley Electronic Press. Hastings International and Comparative Law Review, vol. 32. no. 2, pp 765-77. Summer 2009; “The Words We Use: Justice, Human Rights and the Sense of Injustices.” In Justice in the Mirror, eds. K. Clarke and M. Goodale. Also to be published in Annuario di Anthropologia, Metemi Publishers 2008. Ugo Fabietti, editor. 2009; “Colonial Legacies and Contemporary Contexts” (with Alison Dundes Renteln). In Marie-Claire Foblets et al. (eds). The Response of State Law to the Expression of Cultural Diversity. Bruselles: Francqui foundation. 2009; and “Law and the Frontiers of Illegalities,” In Law, Power, and Control, A. Griffiths, K and F. von Benda-Beckmann, eds. New York: Berghahn Press. 2009

People: Faculty

Profile: Minoo Moallem

Minoo Moallem
Minoo Moallem
Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies
Phone: 510-642-2767
Web: Website

 

Minoo Moallem is a Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies. She chaired the Gender and Women’s Studies department at the University of California at Berkeley from 2008–2010 and the Women’s Studies department at San Francisco State University from 2001–2006. Moallem has recently ventured in digital media. Her online project, “Nation-on-the Move”(design by Eric Loyer), was recently published in Vectors. Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular (Special issue on Difference, Fall 2007).

Publications

  • Between Warrior Brother and Veiled Sister. Islamic Fundamentalism and the Cultural Politics of Patriarchy in Iran, University of California Press, 2005
  • Co-editor (with Caren Kaplan and Norma Alarcon) of Between Woman and Nation. Nationalisms, Transnational Feminisms and The State, Duke University Press, 1999
  • Guest Editor, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East on Iranian Immigrants, Exiles and Refugees.

People: Faculty

Profile: Maria Mavroudi

Maria Mavroudi
Maria Mavroudi
Professor of History and Classics
Phone: 510-642-4218
Web: Website

 

Maria Mavroudi is a Professor of History and Classics. She is a Byzantinist, whose research focuses on the relations between Byzantium and the Arabs, especially bilingualism in Greek and Arabic in the Middle Ages and its implications for cultural exchange between the Byzantine and Islamic world, including the development of Byzantine and Islamic science. Mavroudi earned her B.A. in Philology from the University of Thessaloniki and her Ph.D. in Byzantine Studies at Harvard University.

Publications

  • A Byzantine Book on Dream Interpretation: The Oneirocriticon of Achmet and Its Arabic Sources. E.J. Brill: Leiden, 2002.
  • Artemidorou Oneirocritica. Translation of a 2nd century A.D. manual on dream interpretation from Classical into Modern Greek and Introduction. Histos: Athens, 2002.
  • The Ocult Sciences in Byzantium, ed. with Paul Magdalino (Geneva: éditions de la Pomme d’Or, 2007).
  • Bilingualism in Greek and Arabic: Evidence from the Manuscripts (in preparation).

People: Faculty

Profile: Saba Mahmood

Saba Mahmood
Saba Mahmood
Associate Professor of Social Cultural Anthropology
Phone: 510-642-3392
Web: Website

 

Saba Mahmood is an Associate Professor of Social Cultural Anthropology. Her focus includes the anthropology of subject formation, liberalism, and secular modernity; feminist and poststructuralist theory; religion and politics; and Islam, the Middle East, and South Asia. Mahmood is the recipient of the 2005 Victoria Schuck Award from the American Political Science Association. She also received an Honorable Mention for the 2005 Albert Hourani Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association.

Publications

  • Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.

Her articles include: “Feminism, the Taliban, and Politics of Counter-Insurgency” (with Charles Hirschkind), Anthropological Quarterly Vol. 75, no. 2 (2002): 339-354; “Ethical Formation and Politics of Individual Autonomy in Contemporary Egypt,” Social Research vol. 70, no. 3 (2003): 1501-1530; “Secularism, Hermeneutics, and Empire: The Politics of Islamic Reformation,” Public Culture, vol. 18, no. 2, Spring 2006; “Retooling Feminism and Democracy in the Age of Empire,” in Women Studies on the Edge, edited by Joan W. Scott, Elizabeth Weed, Ellen Rooney, Duke University Press, 2007.

People: Faculty

Profile: Margaret Larkin

Margaret Larkin
Margaret Larkin
Professor of Arabic Literature
Phone: 510-642-3757
Web: Website

 

Margaret Larkin is a Professor of Arabic Literature. She works on both classical and modern Arabic literature in literary and colloquial Arabic. Larkin was named the 2010 Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Department of Arabic and Islamic Civilizations at the American University in Cairo. She is currently at work on a book exploring the tenth century poet, Abu’l-Tayyib al-Mutanabbī, which includes a series of studies on the inter-textual engagement with al-Mutanabbī’s poetry by successive generations of Arab poets. Larkin received her M.A.

Publications

  • The Theology of Meaning: Abd al-Qahir al-Jurjani’s Theory of Discourse. Ann Arbor: American Oriental Society, 1995
  • “Al-Jurjani” in Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia. Oxford: Routledge, 2005
  • Al-Mutanabbī: Voice of the ‘Abbasid Poetic Ideal. Oneworld Publications, 2008
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