Mia Fuller is an Associate Professor of Italian Studies. She is a cultural anthropologist who has combined fieldwork and archival research in her studies of architecture and city planning in the Italian colonies between 1869 and 1943. Her book on the subject, Moderns Abroad: Architecture, Cities, and Italian Imperialism (Routledge, 2007) won the International Planning History Society Book Prize, 2008. She is also the co-editor (with Ruth Ben-Ghiat) of Italian Colonialism (Palgrave, 2005), and she collaborated with filmmaker Caterina Borelli on the documentary film “Asmara, Eritrea” (2008). As part of her continuing interest in the afterlives of Italian colonialism, she organized a conference on Libyan Historiography hosted by the Center in 2009. Currently, she is preparing a book on the vestiges of Italian colonial rule in East Africa and the eastern Mediterranean, as well as an ethnographic, architectural, and oral-historical study of the ‘New Towns’ built in fascist Italy. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1984 and 1994 respectively.

*faculty advisory committee

PUBLICATIONS
  • Moderns Abroad: Architecture, Cities, and Italian Imperialism, London: Routledge (Architext series, series editors Anthony D. King and Thomas Markus), 2007.
  • Italian Colonialism, anthology of 20 essays co-edited with Ruth Ben-Ghiat, New York: Palgrave Macmillan (Italian and Italian American Studies series, series editor Stanislao G. Pugliese), 2005.

Articles and book chapters include: “Preservation and Self-Absorption: Italian Colonisation and the Walled City of Tripoli, Libya,” The Journal of North African Studies 5(4)(2000): 121–54; “The Medina and the Islamic City: Colonial Terms and Postcolonial Legacies,” Public Affairs Report 43(4)(2002): 4-6; “Oases of Ambiguity: On How Italians Did Not Practice Urban Segregation in Tripoli,” in La Libia tra Mediterraneo e mondo islamico (Atti del convegno di Catania, Facoltà di Scienze Politiche, 1–2 dicembre 2000, Aggiornamenti e approfondimenti), edited by Federico Cresti, Milan: Giuffrè, 2006, 163-81; “Mediterraneanism: French and Italian Architects’ Designs in 1930s North African Cities,” in The City in the Islamic World, edited by Salma Khadra Jayyusi, Renata Holod, Attilio Petruccioli, and André Raymond, Leiden: Brill, 2008, 977–92; and “Libya,” in A Historical Companion to Postcolonial Literatures in Continental Europe and Its Empires, edited by Prem Poddar, Rajeev Patke, and Lars Jensen; Edinburgh University Press and Columbia University Press, 2008, 300–304.


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