Apr
30

Soundtrack of the Revolution: The Politics of Music in Iran

5 - 6:30 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Nahid Siamdoust, Yale University

Music is an alternative and revealing way for studying post-revolutionary Iranian society and politics. In this book talk, Nahid Siamdoust discusses music as a potent cultural register that facilitates political expression and communication, while tracing the evolution of cultural and social policy making in Iran. Drawing on over five years of research in Iran, including … Continued

Read More
Apr
10

Reimagining Morocco’s Cultural Heritage for the 21st Century

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Ashley Miller, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In July of 2011, King Mohammed VI of Morocco (r.1999-present) endorsed a constitutional referendum that acknowledged his country’s plural identities and histories in an unprecedented way, describing a Moroccan national identity “forged through the convergence of its Arab-Islamic, Amazigh, and Saharan-Hassanic components, nourished and enriched by its African, Andalusian, Hebraic, and…

Read More
Feb
27

Measure for the Anthropocene: Planetary Imagination and Design

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Neyran Turan, College of Environmental Design

In light of our current political crisis around climate change, what can architecture and design contribute toward a new planetary imaginary of our contemporary environment? If climate change is a crisis of imagination, as literary historian Amitav Ghosh states, or a profound mutation in our relation to the world, as put by Bruno Latour, can … Continued

Read More
Oct
25

The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race

12 - 1:30 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Neda Maghbouleh, University of Toronto

In this talk, based on her new book The Limits of Whiteness (2017, Stanford University Press), sociologist Neda Maghbouleh shares the curious, under-theorized story of how Iranian Americans move across a white/not-white color line. By contextualizing ethnographic data with neglected historical and legal evidence, she offers new evidence for how a “white” American immigrant group … Continued

Read More
Nov
02

Genealogies of Syrian Ba‘thism: Michel ‘Aflaq and Modern Arab Intellectual History

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Max Weiss, Princeton University

Join the CMES for a lecture by Max Weiss, Associate Professor of History and Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. He studies the social, cultural, and intellectual history of the modern Middle East. His research interests include transformations of law and society, religious culture, history of ideas, and the translation of contemporary Arabic literature into … Continued

Read More
Oct
30

The Body/Psyche Politics of Cairo’s El-Nadeem

4:30 - 6 p.m.
LeConte Hall 3
Frances Hasso, Duke University

El-Nadeem Center for the Rehabilitation of Victims of Violence is a women-initiated and dominated non-governmental activist organization established in Cairo in 1993 as a psychological counseling center by university professor and labor activist Dr. Aida Seif al-Dawla and two other psychiatrists to ameliorate the traumas of Egyptian and refugee torture victims. Over time, El-Nadeem developed…

Read More
Oct
09

Jerusalem, on the Moving Edge of Israeli Colonial Rule

4:30 - 6 p.m.
Cory Hall 277
Thomas Abowd, Tufts University

This presentation will analyze how colonialism and colonial urbanism remain a crucial component of contemporary Palestinian and Israeli realities. It seeks to illuminate everyday life as well as the broader institutional forces that comprise and enable Israeli urban policy in Jerusalem. What kinds of barriers—physical, legal, and discursive—operate to keep Israeli-occupied Jerusalem a city of…

Read More