Oct
31

Citizen-Enemies: Military Courts in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340

The 1967 Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories produced a boomerang effect on Palestinian citizens within the 1948 borders, re-framing them as citizen-enemies. While the Israeli legal regime of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip is extensively researched, this study extends its focus to the interrelations between the different parts comprising the Israeli “imperial formation.” … Continued

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Aug
29

Emptied Lands: A Legal Geography of Bedouin Rights in the Negev

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Alexandre Kedar, University of Haifa School of Law

The talk will introduce Emptied Lands (Stanford University Press, 2018), a book that investigates the protracted legal, planning, and territorial conflict between the settler Israeli state and indigenous Bedouin citizens over traditional lands in southern Israel/Palestine. The book places this dispute in historical, legal, geographical, and international-comparative perspectives, providing the…

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Apr
05

Istanbul: Living with Difference in a Global City

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Nora Fisher-Onar & E. Fuat Keyman

Panelists will discuss their new volume Istanbul: Living with Difference in a Global City (Rutgers University Press, 2018) which asks: What does Istanbul teach us, for better or for worse, about living with the Other? The interdisciplinary group of contributors hail from politics, international studies, area studies, urban studies, sociology, anthropology, and geography. Chapters examine…

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Apr
26

Soundtrack of the Revolution: The Politics of Music in Iran

6 - 7:30 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Nahid Siamdoust, Yale University

Music is an alternative and revealing way for studying post-revolutionary Iranian society and politics. In this book talk, Nahid Siamdoust discusses music as a potent cultural register that facilitates political expression and communication, while tracing the evolution of cultural and social policy making in Iran. Drawing on over five years of research in Iran, including … Continued

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Apr
10

Reimagining Morocco’s Cultural Heritage for the 21st Century

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Ashley Miller, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In July of 2011, King Mohammed VI of Morocco (r.1999-present) endorsed a constitutional referendum that acknowledged his country’s plural identities and histories in an unprecedented way, describing a Moroccan national identity “forged through the convergence of its Arab-Islamic, Amazigh, and Saharan-Hassanic components, nourished and enriched by its African, Andalusian, Hebraic, and…

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Mar
19

Politics of Religion in Post-Coup Turkey

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Yunus Doğan Telliel, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

While there remain many unanswered questions regarding the July 2016 coup attempt, most Turkish citizens seem to agree with the government that putschists were linked to Fethullah Gülen and the Hizmet movement. Although the government was decisive about what some call ‘de-Gülenification’ in state and private sectors, the possibility of a coup organized by a … Continued

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Feb
27

Measure for the Anthropocene: Planetary Imagination and Design

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Neyran Turan, College of Environmental Design

In light of our current political crisis around climate change, what can architecture and design contribute toward a new planetary imaginary of our contemporary environment? If climate change is a crisis of imagination, as literary historian Amitav Ghosh states, or a profound mutation in our relation to the world, as put by Bruno Latour, can … Continued

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Oct
25

The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race

12 - 1:30 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Neda Maghbouleh, University of Toronto

In this talk, based on her new book The Limits of Whiteness (2017, Stanford University Press), sociologist Neda Maghbouleh shares the curious, under-theorized story of how Iranian Americans move across a white/not-white color line. By contextualizing ethnographic data with neglected historical and legal evidence, she offers new evidence for how a “white” American immigrant group … Continued

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Nov
02

Genealogies of Syrian Ba‘thism: Michel ‘Aflaq and Modern Arab Intellectual History

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Stephens Hall 340
Max Weiss, Princeton University

Join the CMES for a lecture by Max Weiss, Associate Professor of History and Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. He studies the social, cultural, and intellectual history of the modern Middle East. His research interests include transformations of law and society, religious culture, history of ideas, and the translation of contemporary Arabic literature into … Continued

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